Tag Archives: vegan

What the heck’s wrong with pizza?

I’d like to devote this blog entry to pizza.  I have traveled all over the globe, and while there is nothing like pizza in NYC, Chicago or the mother land (Italia), I would be lying if I didn’t tell you that my fathers pizza is literally out of this world.  With all the places I’ve traveled, I have still never come across anything that remotely touches my dads pizza.  In addition, I’m a pretty good cook myself, and I can’t touch it either.  It’s truly legendary.

Of course, he makes his own dough, which is a step up from anything you’ll ever get in a restaurant that offers pizza.  In addition, the sauce is also homemade, and he only uses fresh ingredients.  However…

Pizza is not really something that works well for me.  Let’s just start with the dough.  It’s wheat-based, and I am allergic to wheat.  Gluten-free dough is much, much better, but very few places carry that kind of dough.  The cheese is probably the worst offender, and for so many reasons.  Despite my absolute love for cheese and wine, cheese is one of the most unhealthy things we can eat, and for a variety of reasons.

It’s not rocket science anymore… Most everyone is well-aware that human beings don’t actually need dairy, in fact the entire way cheese is processed and the way milk is homogenized is problematic.  I recently read a statistic that France and Ireland have the highest rate of breast cancer anywhere… Both of these country’s diets are cheese and meat-driven, and I cannot help but wonder if there’s a correlation.

When most cheese is made, however, the lactose in milk is converted into lactic acid by bacteria. The resultant acid begins the curdling process that eventually results in cheese, and little – if any – lactose remains at the end. Sometimes even trace amounts of lactose can trigger sensitive individuals, but cheese is usually fairly safe. A good general rule is the longer a cheese is aged, the less lactose it’ll have. Another thing to remember: the less lactose a cheese has, the less carbohydrates.

HOWEVER…

Complications arise because of the acidity in cheese.  Medical Microbiologist and author, Dr. Robert O. Young says, “That is why I have stated, “acid is pain and pain is acid.” You cannot have one without the other. This is the beginning of latent tissue acidosis leading to irritation, inflammation and degeneration of the cells, tissues and organs. After a rich animal protein or dairy product meal, the urine pH becomes alkaline. The ingestion of meat and cheese causes a reaction in acidic fashion in the organism by the production of sulfuric, phosporhoric, nitric, uric, lactic, acetylaldehyde and ethanol acids, respectively, but also through the formation and excretion of base in the urine. Therefore eating meat and cheese causes a double loss of bases leading to tissue acidosis and eventual disease, especially inflammation and degenerative diseases.”

I was in an accident 11 years ago, that opened the door for arthritis to blast the areas of my body that were traumatized from the collision.  It’s been quite a battle, and when my doctor who was doing all of the food allergy testing then told me that I have “Gout,” I was floored.  “Gout?” I said… “That’s for the seriously old.”  He asked for more blood-work… and I tentatively obliged.  As he suspected, my acid levels were off the charts.  This was the beginning of my indoctrination into the world of pH balance, and eating according to our design, which is more alkaline.  Acid causes disease and it causes pain.  When I asked the doctor what I could do for gout he said, “Yeah, become a vegan.”  I was aghast!  For an Italian, with the kind of eating tradition I was used to, I couldn’t even wrap my  brain around that concept.  All I could think of was the few vegans that I had encountered over the years, who were hippies with grown out arm-pit hair, unshaved legs, etc.  You get the idea… everything was a-natural… Believe me.  This was NOT something I wanted to remotely embrace.  In a nutshell, I was pissed.

One can begin to understand why eating vats of sauce, cannoli’s, pasta, pizza and slabs of roast were all not what this new doctor would order.  Indeed, it was out with the roast and in with kale, but it didn’t happen overnight.  Believe me, I bucked this for YEARS!  I was more upset about giving up things like polenta, semolina pasta and rib eye steaks than chocolate or ice cream.

Bottom line—these foods on an occasion are not the thing that’s going to make us sick, but continuous consumption of acid-driven, carb-bent, animal protein will become a health issue at some point.  I began to research and read everything I could get my hand on about arthritis and gout (which is another form of arthritis). All disease is formed because of an over-acidification in the body…In other words, disease comes about when a person’s pH is not alkaline balanced, but acidic.  Even more interesting, especially when considering my diet while growing up, gout is called the “rich mans disease,” and it is caused from too much protein in the diet.  Animal-based protein, which when broken down in the body produces ACID in the blood.

Perhaps the saying, “You are what you eat” is true.  There is no doubt in my mind that my “Italian” protein-driven, carb-based diet laid the groundwork for issues as I got older.  By the way… pasta, polenta and bread all break down in the body as sugar, and sugar is acidic.

When choosing between pizza, tradition and familiarity, or learning a new way to eat, I eventually did choose the later, and WOW…what a difference it’s made!

But, more on that later…

Source:  Great article to read!

http://articlesofhealth.blogspot.com/2011/09/why-eating-meat-and-cheese-leads-to.html

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Spiked punch

As I previously mentioned, my father was an opera conductor.  I’ll never forget one of the after-party’s following the closing of  a production of Madame Butterfly.  There must have been 200 people crammed in our house.  Everyone was still dressed in either evening attire, tuxedoes or black evening gowns, and as always, there were literally tables of food scattered everywhere, an open bar in the living room and a table with a large bowl, filled with spiked punch, various cheeses, meats and assorted appetizers.  Naturally, my father and mother prepared the main course, which was usually lasagna or manicotti’s.  In short, the place was filled with stuffed food and stuffed people!

My younger brother was a bit of a prankster, and was never very enthused with the yuppity party’s that my parents threw.  So, you can well imagine that mischief was always lurking around the corner.  On this particular night, he was bored as usual and my father was in a jovial mood.  The truth be known, one of my parents musician friends had definitely been dipping into the spiked punch one too many times.  Actually, he was probably hitting the open bar, and using the spiked punch as a chaser for the food.  In short, he was plowed.  So, my brother decided to practice his pitch (he was a left-handed baseball pitcher) using strawberries as the ball and the back of this guys bald head as the target.  Fire 1, fire 2, fire 3…he never knew what hit him.  It got worse.  Instead of my father scolding my brother, he was laughing and saying…”What in the heck are you doing?  He looks like a strawberry shortcake!”  So, my brother proceeded to go to the refrigerator, pull-out a can of whipped cream, and he walked over to this guy, hugged him and while they were having a chat, he sprayed the whip cream in his tuxedo pocket without this guy ever even knowing.  🙂 About five minutes later, the man put his hands in his pockets and yelled out,  “Good God!  What is this?”  I won’t begin to tell you how much my father, brother, sister and I laughed over this.  Since the man was so intoxicated, he never did put the pieces together, and we all had a good laugh looking at this human strawberry shortcake.

Back to the FOOD:

So, while this was a special event, once again, I was eating foods that were high in fat, carb-driven, loaded with dairy, and undoubtedly not gluten-free or sugar-free.  Since I didn’t normally gravitate toward the dessert table, I was under the impression that I was eating healthy.  I couldn’t have been more mislead.

Once again, I am more convinced than ever that my lifestyle growing up helped pave the way for some of the health issues that I’ve been dealing with off an on for the last 20 years.  It’s been a long road.  I’ve not always wanted to surrender what’s been familiar to me, but after changing my ways and eating organic, vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free, I’m feeling so much better.  It’s no wonder that I’m rethinking Italian!

Stuffed and puffy

“The wise man should consider that health is the greatest of human blessings. Let food be your medicine.” – Hippocrates

When I was around 36, I began to have a lot of hormone-related issues, in fact, I skipped my menstrual cycle for 6 months–the doctor thought it might be a false pregnancy. Instead of giving birth after 9 months, I had gained nearly 90 lbs, and suffered from serious edema.  My diet was not any different.  I was still having an “Italian” moment, eating predominately pastas, salads, and beef, lamb, chicken or fish.  Somehow, I had figured out that bread was probably not a good idea for me, so I didn’t eat much bread, but pasta was a popular mainstay.  Not only in my diet, but it was being pushed in the health/diet industry at that time.  All of the health-gurus seemed to be on a pasta agenda, which only furthered my idea that I was eating healthy.  I walked about 4 times a week, yet I continued to blow up like a balloon.  It wasn’t just weight gain either; I didn’t have the typical sagging, ripply cellulite fat, but I looked stuffed and puffy.  My traditional doctor offered a hard-hit of progesterone, which contributed largely to my weight gain.  At that time, I didn’t realize that it is basically a steroid. In addition, I was tired all the time, which didn’t work well since I had 2 children that had very active schedules.  I felt like I was slipping down a slippery slope quickly, and I knew something had to be done.

My mother came to visit and she hadn’t seen me in about 7 or 8 months.  When she saw how much weight I had gained, how puffy I looked, and got a glimpse of the skin rashes I was dealing with, she insisted that I find a specialist.  I found an alternative doctor who was truly genius, and his influence was pivotal in opening my eyes to the things we eat.  He began his medical journey as a research psychiatrist, and found himself more interested in body chemistry as related to weight gain and allergy issues, so he went back to medical school and became an allergist.  After completing his training, he worked in the field for a brief time, but returned to school to study nutrition and holistic health.  It’s no secret that medical school students are not required to take more than one class on nutrition.  He shared with me that he felt incompetent as an allergist with little to no “real” knowledge of nutrition and the foods we eat.” So, in short, this physician was extremely well-rounded.  He was qualified as an M.D., but also as a nutritionist and holistic doctor.

On my first visit with Dr. Philip Taylor, he sat me down, took out a notepad and literally interviewed me for an hour.  He asked me questions about my childhood, what we ate, about my cravings, my marriage (I thought, “How odd…”), my current symptoms, and just about anything you could imagine. After an hour, he put his pen down, looked up at me and said.  “You’re a mess, and you also have chronic food allergies.”  I remember sitting there thinking, “Who is this guy?  I mean he didn’t even examine me.” He then asked me to step into his exam room, where we would begin food allergy testing.  He said, “I don’t believe in doing scratch tests for food allergies. Those work wonders if you have environmental allergies, but since food is ingested, I like to inject a little of the food under your skin to see what happens.”  Oh great.  I heard the word, “Inject,” and knew this was not going to be fun.  I’m not a fan of needles. Nearly everything he tested me for I reacted to, and wheat and dairy were the worst.  I didn’t just have a skin reaction, my arm blew up and I developed a migraine within about 20 minutes.  NOT a good sign.

The entire process took about 3 months, but at the end I was told about all of the things I could no longer eat.  In some respects I was relieved, but also a bit pissed off.  I felt somewhat cursed.  Imagine being an Italian with the food heritage I’ve had, only to find out that 90% of what I ate growing up contributed to my health issues. I couldn’t just go on a diet, avoid them for a season and then go back to eating the same foods.  Dr. Taylor opened my eyes to the fact that I needed to accept a permanent lifestyle change or I would continue to have these kinds of issues if I didn’t, and they would only get worse.  Change was imminent.

…Yet still…the road has not been easy.

“What is food to one man may be fierce poison to others”
– Lucretius. 95-55 B. C.

New Beginnings

I need another blog like I need a hole in my head, however…  I am Italian and I want to talk about food–the two seem to go hand-in-hand!

I am an American Italian woman in my mid-fifties who loves to cook.  My father’s family are all from Italy.  Worse still, my father owned an Italian restaurant, which only added more calories into the mix.  That being said, you can well-imagine our meals at home when I was growing up.  It went something like this:

Breakfast:  Italian eggs (loose scrambled eggs, leftover homemade pasta sauce, crushed garlic, fresh basil, fresh oregano and fennel seed, grated provolone cheese, grated romano cheese, and salt and pepper), sour bread toast, milk or orange juice, fresh fruit.  Occasionally we would have cereal, but not that often.

Lunch:  Varied somewhere between pasta, pizza or Italian sub sandwiches, with a tall glass of milk (of course it was for our “bones”).

Dinner:  Don’t even get me started… Sirloin or Filet Minion (stuffed with prosciutto, crushed garlic, mushrooms, oregano, provolone cheese, and various seasonings, then rubbed with fresh garlic, olive oil, salt and pepper), pasta (the pasta was our potato), garlic bread, green salad, and fruit for dessert.  There were also the lasagna or homemade pizza and ravioli moments, and my father’s famous deep fried calzones covered with sauce, and fresh grated romano cheese.

I was very active growing up, in fact, I danced ballet for 22 years, played on a woman’s tennis league, swam almost daily during the summer months, and enjoyed snow skiing and hiking on a regular basis.  Whatever crazy calories I consumed at home, I burned off because of my active lifestyle.

Once I was married and began a family of my own, I carried on the cooking tradition with my own family.  My children’s friends always wanted to spend the night at our house, and it’s clear why:  There was always a huge pot of homemade sauce on the stove, cookies in the oven, and a fully loaded refrigerator and pantry.  In short, we ate well…very, very well.

By the time I hit my late thirties, I began to have some health issues.  Weight gain (gee, I wonder why), chronic rashes, that would go away for a season and then return with a greater vengeance. Finally in my mid-forties, I developed Wilson’s Thyroid Syndrome, which is a quirky thyroid disorder that affects the T-3, and  eventually controls your ability to burn food.  Hence, to my horror,  my weight began to accelerate.

I was never an over-eater per say, but my diet was meat and carb-driven.  In addition, I was never a big dessert lover.  In fact, growing up we only ate desserts during the holiday’s, at special events, or for someone’s birthday.  Yet, with the combination of thyroid issues, and the rashes (which turned out to be related to food allergies), I began to blow-up like a balloon.  I wasn’t eating sugar, but my diet was primarily carb-driven, which ultimately turns into sugar.

…and I thought we ate so healthy…

Over the years, this began to worsen, and finally when I was just turning 50, I sought out alternative medical help, because traditional medicine was providing no “real” solutions.  I was given new diets, diet drinks (loaded with sugar), hormones, prednisone for the rashes, but only continued in a yo-yo cycle of ill-health and weight gain.  My new doctor started with food allergy testing.  It was quite a blow to find out that I am allergic to: wheat, rye, corn, sugar cane, chocolate, coffee bean, all dairy (except goat’s milk), MSG.(that was no loss), beef and brewer’s yeast.  Naturally, my response to all of this was, “What the heck is left for me to eat?”

That question began a journey that I am still on. I have had to re-think and re-learn eating, and cooking while being open to change.  It’s not easy for a woman my age to do, especially with my heritage and my connection to gourmet Italian foods.

However… I am doing it, little-by-little, step by step, and I am learning how to prepare healthy, organic, vegetable-based foods, that taste AMAZING! Who says healthy has to taste bad?  Just because it’s vegan or vegetarian, doesn’t mean you should feel like mooing after sitting down to dinner.

So, here I am…writing another blog, talking about food and sharing my journey.  As an Italian food aficionada–who loves and embraces life, I invite you to join me!

“Laugh as much as you breathe and love as long as you live!” Quest’ la vita il gioire ~ This is the life and the joy. ♥