Tag Archives: party’s

Back to the drawing board

I’m definitely on a journey, and one with a big learning curve.  Just when I think, “I’ve got this,” one of life’s “suddenly” moments happens, and I’m back to square one.

My relationship with food has been turbulent, at times difficult, and revolutionary.  Turbulent because of the health issues that sprang up over the years after eating a diet that was carb, meat and dairy-driven; difficult because of my heritage as an American Italian (food is so much a part of the culture), and revolutionary because of the change I had  to commit to once I realized that my eating habits were compromising my health.

Even with all the health challenges I’ve developed over the years, and the knowledge I’ve acquired, I still falter and fumble.  It’s astounding to me how taste-influenced I am, and how bound to tradition I am.  What am I talking about?  The holidays.

Thanksgiving was a serious blow-out. I don’t think there was one ounce of food inhaled (with the exception of lemon water) that I was not allergic to, or that should have been off-limits to me.  YET, I not only participated in the feast, I cooked much of the food.  It was traditional with a hint of Italian on the side.  I made (by request) about a dozen calzones.  Granted, I made them as healthy as I could, but still.  I even made half of them vegetarian (they were delicious)!

I suppose I shouldn’t be amazed after eating mounds of holiday food, calzones made with regular pizza dough, filled with mozzarella cheese, parmesan cheese, and then deep fried that my blood pressure spiked, my gout flared up, and my joints ached.  I consumed a day of acid-driven foods.

Why did I do it? Why do we do it?

What is it about the holidays that makes this kind of crazy eating so alluring?

Perhaps it has more to do with people coming together socially than actually the food.  I mean, a kitchen is frequently the gathering spot for many a group of people, and the holiday season seems to amplify that reality.  Add being Italian into the mix and it’s practically a lost cause — a guaranteed food frenzy.  It’s a month and a half eating whirlwind that seems to give everything fattening, rich and grossly unhealthy top billing.  Stats show that on average, Americans gain about one to two pounds during the holiday season.

What can one do?

I truly believe that the holidays don’t have to be a weight-gaining nightmare. There are some things you can do to avoid widening your waistline.

For one, you need to make sure you don’t eat more than one helping of anything! Also, don’t skip meals before the event.  Skipping meals only sets you up to completely overeat, and don’t skip breakfast– it’s the most important meal of the day.   Avoid eating second and third helpings (most people totally bypass this rule).  keep your portions small, and eat desserts in moderation.  You know, tasting one or two delicacies vs. piling every assortment on a salad plate and then some!  Eat more salad than anything else.  You can’t go wrong with greens! Lastly, take a walk with family or friends after dinner.  Exercise is always a good idea.

Buon-Natale

 

Spiked punch

As I previously mentioned, my father was an opera conductor.  I’ll never forget one of the after-party’s following the closing of  a production of Madame Butterfly.  There must have been 200 people crammed in our house.  Everyone was still dressed in either evening attire, tuxedoes or black evening gowns, and as always, there were literally tables of food scattered everywhere, an open bar in the living room and a table with a large bowl, filled with spiked punch, various cheeses, meats and assorted appetizers.  Naturally, my father and mother prepared the main course, which was usually lasagna or manicotti’s.  In short, the place was filled with stuffed food and stuffed people!

My younger brother was a bit of a prankster, and was never very enthused with the yuppity party’s that my parents threw.  So, you can well imagine that mischief was always lurking around the corner.  On this particular night, he was bored as usual and my father was in a jovial mood.  The truth be known, one of my parents musician friends had definitely been dipping into the spiked punch one too many times.  Actually, he was probably hitting the open bar, and using the spiked punch as a chaser for the food.  In short, he was plowed.  So, my brother decided to practice his pitch (he was a left-handed baseball pitcher) using strawberries as the ball and the back of this guys bald head as the target.  Fire 1, fire 2, fire 3…he never knew what hit him.  It got worse.  Instead of my father scolding my brother, he was laughing and saying…”What in the heck are you doing?  He looks like a strawberry shortcake!”  So, my brother proceeded to go to the refrigerator, pull-out a can of whipped cream, and he walked over to this guy, hugged him and while they were having a chat, he sprayed the whip cream in his tuxedo pocket without this guy ever even knowing.  🙂 About five minutes later, the man put his hands in his pockets and yelled out,  “Good God!  What is this?”  I won’t begin to tell you how much my father, brother, sister and I laughed over this.  Since the man was so intoxicated, he never did put the pieces together, and we all had a good laugh looking at this human strawberry shortcake.

Back to the FOOD:

So, while this was a special event, once again, I was eating foods that were high in fat, carb-driven, loaded with dairy, and undoubtedly not gluten-free or sugar-free.  Since I didn’t normally gravitate toward the dessert table, I was under the impression that I was eating healthy.  I couldn’t have been more mislead.

Once again, I am more convinced than ever that my lifestyle growing up helped pave the way for some of the health issues that I’ve been dealing with off an on for the last 20 years.  It’s been a long road.  I’ve not always wanted to surrender what’s been familiar to me, but after changing my ways and eating organic, vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free, I’m feeling so much better.  It’s no wonder that I’m rethinking Italian!